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MCRD PARRIS ISLAND, SC - OFFICIAL PAGEfacebook.com
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Simulated assault provides grounds to improve readiness Marines, sailors and civilians participated in an active shooter exercise called, “Operation Social Fury,” at the Recycling Center aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Aug. 27. The exercise provided an opportunity to safely hone their skills should a situation of this nature arise.

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Marines learn survival skills in mountainous terrain - U.S. Marine Pfc. Jose Gutierrez makes a bow drill fire starter during Mountain Exercise 2014 aboard Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport, Calif., Aug. 28, 2014. Gutierrez is an infantry rifleman assigned to 2nd Platoon, India Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment will become the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s ground combat element in October. Mountain Exercise 2014 develops critical skills the battalion will need during deployment. 

Photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos
Facebook: http://j.mp/1grZzo6
Twitter: http://j.mp/1pcqDNy
 by 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit http://flic.kr/p/oYaoBW

Marines learn survival skills in mountainous terrain - U.S. Marine Pfc. Jose Gutierrez makes a bow drill fire starter during Mountain Exercise 2014 aboard Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport, Calif., Aug. 28, 2014. Gutierrez is an infantry rifleman assigned to 2nd Platoon, India Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment will become the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s ground combat element in October. Mountain Exercise 2014 develops critical skills the battalion will need during deployment.

Photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos
Facebook: http://j.mp/1grZzo6
Twitter: http://j.mp/1pcqDNy
by 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit http://flic.kr/p/oYaoBW

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140829-M-DL610-057 - Cpl. Chesty XIV, Marine Corps mascot, gets promoted during a ceremony at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., Aug. 29, 2014. Cpl. Chesty XIV was promoted by Gen. James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, and Sgt. Maj. Micheal Barrett, sergeant major of the Marine Corps. (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dan Hosack/Released) by Marine Barracks Washington 8th & I http://flic.kr/p/oFtwB7

140829-M-DL610-057 - Cpl. Chesty XIV, Marine Corps mascot, gets promoted during a ceremony at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., Aug. 29, 2014. Cpl. Chesty XIV was promoted by Gen. James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, and Sgt. Maj. Micheal Barrett, sergeant major of the Marine Corps. (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dan Hosack/Released) by Marine Barracks Washington 8th & I http://flic.kr/p/oFtwB7

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Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diegofacebook.com
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Graduation Ceremony – Delta Company – August 29, 2014facebook.com
After being transformed by the nation’s toughest boot camp, hundreds of new U.S. Marines graduated from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island on August 29, 2014, joining the Corps’ ranks to carry o …

Graduation Ceremony – Delta Company – August 29, 2014
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After being transformed by the nation’s toughest boot camp, hundreds of new U.S. Marines graduated from Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island on August 29, 2014, joining the Corps’ ranks to carry o …

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Anonymous asked
Hello: I'm severely overweight (5'11" 310 lbs.), and was looking into getting gastric bypass. Would this type of procedure disqualify me? Thanks for your time.

According to the Military Personnel Procurement Manual:

(d) The following conditions are not waiverable and should be considered permanently disqualifying.

26 Intestinal bypass surgery.

So yes it would.

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Anonymous asked
I have talked to many current & ex military and they have told me about the DLAB if I do take it & pass what kind of opportunities may it open up to me if I am thinking 0311 or a form of intelligence if I do qualify for those mos

The Defense Language Aptitude Battery (DLAB) measures an individual’s ability to learn a language and is also used to identify Marines that may be selected for follow-on language training.

In other words the Defense Language Aptitude Battery (DLAB) is basically a language proficiency test. “Marines fluent in a foreign language can earn extra pay based on that skill. To receive foreign language pay, a Marine must first take the Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT). The test is comprised of three parts: reading, listening and speaking, and is available at some base education centers” via a request form.

There is a great write up on Marines Blog By Cpl. Daniel Wetzel describing it. Some Marines in occupational fields 02xx and 26xx are required to take the test either during their recruit training or duty station.

As far as opportunities opening up to you, who can really say. It would be a great thing to have in a grunt (infantry) unit though, don’t you think.

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Giving back to the Corps - Sgt. Dwayne Martin-Farley currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Martin-Farley joined the Marine Corps in October 2005 and became a drill instructor in September 2011. “I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps after all the great experiences it gave me,” said Martin-Farley. “I wanted to have an impact on the younger generation of Marines. When I see a young individual go from self-centered to within three months transitioning into a very selfless individual who cares more about others than themselves, I know I’ve done my job.” Martin-Farley, 27, is from Apopka, Fla. About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oFmELW

Giving back to the Corps - Sgt. Dwayne Martin-Farley currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Martin-Farley joined the Marine Corps in October 2005 and became a drill instructor in September 2011. “I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps after all the great experiences it gave me,” said Martin-Farley. “I wanted to have an impact on the younger generation of Marines. When I see a young individual go from self-centered to within three months transitioning into a very selfless individual who cares more about others than themselves, I know I’ve done my job.” Martin-Farley, 27, is from Apopka, Fla. About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oFmELW

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Company M Liberty Call - Aug. 28, 2014facebook.com
After 13 weeks of being separated from one another, new Marines are reunited with family, friends and loved ones for five hours of on-base liberty a day prior to their official graduation from Marine  …

Congratulations to all the new Marines graduating from Marine Corps Recruit Training today - Ooh Rah and Semper Fidelis!

Company M Liberty Call - Aug. 28, 2014
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After 13 weeks of being separated from one another, new Marines are reunited with family, friends and loved ones for five hours of on-base liberty a day prior to their official graduation from Marine …

Congratulations to all the new Marines graduating from Marine Corps Recruit Training today - Ooh Rah and Semper Fidelis!

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Delta Company – Rappel Tower – July 8, 2014facebook.com
After tying harnesses around their waists and legs, the recruits of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, rappelled from a 47-foot-tall tower July 8, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. This trainin …

Congratulations to all the new Marines graduating from Marine Corps Recruit Training today - Ooh Rah and Semper Fidelis!

Delta Company – Rappel Tower – July 8, 2014
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After tying harnesses around their waists and legs, the recruits of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, rappelled from a 47-foot-tall tower July 8, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. This trainin …

Congratulations to all the new Marines graduating from Marine Corps Recruit Training today - Ooh Rah and Semper Fidelis!

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Unload Show Clear - Marines aboard an amphibious assault vehicle exit the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). Bataan is the flagship for the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and, with the embarked 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. 

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class RJ Stratchko/Released) by United States Marine Corps Official Page http://flic.kr/p/oUeVDf

Unload Show Clear - Marines aboard an amphibious assault vehicle exit the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). Bataan is the flagship for the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group and, with the embarked 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class RJ Stratchko/Released) by United States Marine Corps Official Page http://flic.kr/p/oUeVDf

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Pugil - Rct. Austin Root, left, Platoon 1056, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, prepares to fight Rct. Donte Moss, Platoon 1056, during pugil stick training June 24, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The recruits wear helmets, flak vests, mouth guards and gloves as they fight in 15-second bouts with pugil sticks, large padded batons that represent rifles with affixed bayonets. Pugil stick training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which fuses hand-to-hand combat skills with character development, yielding a strong, morally sound Marine warrior. Root, a 19-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., and Moss, an 18-year-old from Green Pond, S.C., are scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oWceNe

Pugil - Rct. Austin Root, left, Platoon 1056, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, prepares to fight Rct. Donte Moss, Platoon 1056, during pugil stick training June 24, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The recruits wear helmets, flak vests, mouth guards and gloves as they fight in 15-second bouts with pugil sticks, large padded batons that represent rifles with affixed bayonets. Pugil stick training is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which fuses hand-to-hand combat skills with character development, yielding a strong, morally sound Marine warrior. Root, a 19-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., and Moss, an 18-year-old from Green Pond, S.C., are scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oWceNe

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Low crawl - Rct. Jonathan Hughes, Platoon 3057, Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawls on a combat training course July 29, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The basic combat training recruits receive while on Parris Island will be broadened after boot camp at follow-on training in Camp Lejeune, N.C. Hughes, 19, from Greenwich, Conn., is scheduled to graduate Aug. 22, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oDGVPU

Low crawl - Rct. Jonathan Hughes, Platoon 3057, Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, crawls on a combat training course July 29, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The basic combat training recruits receive while on Parris Island will be broadened after boot camp at follow-on training in Camp Lejeune, N.C. Hughes, 19, from Greenwich, Conn., is scheduled to graduate Aug. 22, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oDGVPU

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Climb to the top - Rct. Christopher Barnikel, Platoon 1057, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, struggles to continue exercising during an incentive training session June 12, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Barnikel, an 18-year-old from Lake Worth, Fla., and his fellow recruits completed a series of exercises to correct their minor disciplinary infractions. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oDGcR6

Climb to the top - Rct. Christopher Barnikel, Platoon 1057, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, struggles to continue exercising during an incentive training session June 12, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Barnikel, an 18-year-old from Lake Worth, Fla., and his fellow recruits completed a series of exercises to correct their minor disciplinary infractions. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 29, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis) by MCRD Parris Island, SC http://flic.kr/p/oDGcR6

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